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Fuel Line

Electric Fuel Pumps Replacing Mechanical

Carburettor engines are typically equipped with mechanical fuel pumps. They are located directly on the engine and are driven by a cam and push rod or directly via a lever.

 

These pumps are mostly diaphragm pumps. The pump draws fuel from the fuel tank and feeds it to the carburettor.

Diesel engines are also frequently equipped with diaphragm pumps. However with diesel, these pumps are needed as pre-feeder pumps to supply the injection pump with fuel.

Although mechanical fuel pumps are designed for long periods of operation, contamination, wear and hardening of the diaphragm and seals can lead to malfunction, leakage, or failures.

Mechanical pumps are not commonly repaired, except on certain diesel applications. In the main, if a pump is defective, it can only be replaced.

If mechanical replacement pumps are available, replacing them is no problem. The following points must be considered when replacing a pump:

  • Avoid getting dirt or other foreign matter in the engine through the drive opening.
  • A new pump is only to be installed with the cam in its low position.
  • In every case the flange seal must be replaced with the proper size.
  • Push rods or levers must be centred on the cam when the pump operates. If this is not the case, the push rod or lever can break.
  • There must be no wear on the cam.

Only quality replacement parts should be used when replacing fuel pumps. 'Cheaper' pumps offered on the market often have both qualitative and functional disadvantages. For example, the delivery rate, particularly at higher temperatures, is often so low that malfunctions occur.

Now that the number of vehicles with carburettor engines has decreased significantly, mechanical pumps are only manufactured as spare parts and for a few diesel or special applications. As a result, it is often the case that original replacement mechanical pumps are no longer available. If this is the case, the installation of an electric fuel pump is a practical, cost-effective solution. This also applies to applications for vintage cars or when a mechanical drive is no longer feasible due to wear on the cam.

The E1F series of Pierburg pumps is an ideal solution for many application scenarios. They are available with different delivery rates and pressures, as well as for 12 or 24 volt operation. These pumps offer a simple, reliable solution for delivering fuel in a variety of other cases, such as boats, agricultural and construction equipment or as a replenishing pump for commercial vehicles or buses with auxiliary tanks.

 

For guidance on fitting electric fuel pumps, please refer to the following service documents, available in 'Service Information' under 'Pierburg':

  • SI 0062 "Installation of an electric fuel pump E1F to replace a mechanical fuel pump"
  • SI 0063 "Installation of an electric fuel pump E1F as an additional pump"

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